The Infinity Garden…


Living even more sustainably in Twenty-Twenty-One is one of my primary goals (beyond surviving the impact of Covid-19 of course).

I made significant in-roads into reducing my own, my families and my colleagues carbon footprint (via a Sustainability Cook Book I released to the masses in late December). Some of it by my own volition and some of it as a consequence of this year’s limitations on travel and consumerism.

In the book “How Bad Are Bananas” by Mike Berners-Lee, it proposes that we should all try to live a 5 tonnes lifestyle (less where possible), and after doing the official UN carbon footprint calculation, my families overall tonnage was twenty-four tonnes, 6 tonnes per head, not bad when you look at the average in say Australia is twenty tonnes per head.

So a few further tweaks to the family processes next year (switching to hybrid car, off-boarding one of the children to his own house and eating a plant/fish-based diet with minimal red meat) will help reduce it to four tonnes per head. Phase One complete, Phase Two being the long term plan of setting up an off-grid small holding.

My foray into techno-agriculture (Blade Runner 2049 larva farm on standby) was met with some success. Growing my own produce (albeit in micro-quantities) gave me some insights to cultivating edibles and The Infinity Garden is currently performing admirably…

The Infinity Garden v1.0
“We sow the seed, nature grows the seed, and we eat the seed” – Neil The Hippy

I have been impressed with the quality of the growth, I had heard mixed reviews on the outputs, but I must say everything that has churned out thus far has been very “Cuprinol”.

Basil…
Chilli Peppers…
Coriander…
Lavender…
Mini Tomatoes…
Sweet Peppers…

With an addition of not one, but two grow-your-own mushroom kits and a book of the greatest and best Indian Street Food recipes from one of the best (if not the best), restaurants in Liverpool (Mowgli), I feel more armed with organic opportunities already for the coming year.

A friend of mine “I”, who is also part of the eco-retreat build starting soon, has also just acquired nine allotment plots and is keeping an eye out for me so that I can join the collective, putting to bed my vision for a vertical garden in the confined space behind my house.

I would not have thought twelve months ago that I would be that much more in-tune with nature and the universe in general, but it just goes to show that even in chaos, opportunities for positive change are there, one just needs to take a breath, focus and do…

1 thought on “The Infinity Garden…

  1. At best, all food should be sustainably raised from local sources using organic and restorative practices. Beef is no worse and one could easily argue likely better than most plant foods people eat from monocrops produced on industrial agriculture and shipped on mass transportation with the heavy use of oil and chemicals. In fact, eating locally-raised beef is going to be far better for the environment than majority of the plant foods found in a grocery store, especially during the winter in a northern region where they have to be shipped in.

    There are no more runimants in North America and in the rest of the world than existed hundreds and thousands of years ago. For millions of years, they have been essential to healthy ecosystems. That hasn’t changed. Most of the land on earth cannot be farmed and most of it is grasslands that can only serve as food for ruminants, whether wild or domesticated. Even so-called factory-farmed cattle are primarily raised on pasture for most of their lives and 98% of the water they use comes from rainwater. Also, even when fed farmed food, mostly they are fed the parts of plants that humans can’t eat such as stalks.

    All of the accusations of environmental harm from beef fall apart upon scrutiny. Consider another favorite criticism, that of loss of rainforest. The fact of the matter is most rainforest is cleared for mining and logging. Then, once cleared, it is mostly used for growing plant foods like palm oil. The simple truth is that the soil of former rainforests is not great for grazing. No one would cut down a rainforest to raise cattle, but it’s true that people living in those areas will raise some cattle on that sub-optimal land. It’s just blaming deforestation on cattle is simply unfounded. We need to have a serious public debate, but that is hard to do under present conditions of big ag influence.

    https://sustainabledish.com/beef-isnt-to-blame/
    https://www.sacredcow.info/blog/meat-is-magnificent
    https://www.sacredcow.info/blog/beef-is-not-a-water-hog
    https://benjamindavidsteele.wordpress.com/2019/06/29/carnivore-is-vegan/
    https://benjamindavidsteele.wordpress.com/2019/01/21/dietary-dictocrats-of-eat-lancet/

    Liked by 1 person

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